The Adult Education Teacher’s Annotated Webliography

By on September 24, 2013

Source: http://alri.org/pubs/webliography.html

This collection of Web site reviews, which has now grown to include over 50 Web sites, was begun by adult literacy/basic education/ESOL educators in the Boston area in the Spring of 1996. The reviews have been compiled, edited and updated by David J. Rosen, Director of the Adult Literacy Resource Institute, the Greater Boston Regional Support Center of the Massachusetts System for Adult Basic Education Support. The first reviewers were enrolled in the 1996 Boston Internet Training Project workshops funded by a grant from the Massachusetts Department of Education. Time to produce the original document was made possible by the editor’s 1995-1996 fellowship from the National Institute for Literacy. Reviews of Web sites are added periodically, and the Webliography is regularly updated.

Website reviews will be found under the following categories:

Student and Teacher Resources

ESOL (ESL)

Adult Secondary Education (GED/EDP)

Project-based Learning

Adult Education Research

Grants Information

and

Other Interesting Sites



Student and Teacher Resources

MetroBoston Community-Wide Education and Information Service (Review 1 of 3)

http://www2.wgbh.org/MBCWEIS/mbcweisHome.html

This is a good resource site. It includes information about many local learning centers in the Greater Boston area. Not only does it give information about the programs offered in each center, it also gives the history and mission statement of the centers. I would suggest that you read through the possibilities before you click. Then go back and look at the information given in one or another of the local learning centers.

From this site, you can connect to many other resources on the World Wide Web. It was here I discovered the link to lycos, alta vista, et al! (bookmark this one!)

Ellen Dabrieo, SND
Notre Dame Education Center
South Boston, Massachusetts
June, 1996


MetroBoston Community-Wide Education and Information Service (Review 2 of 3)

http://www2.wgbh.org/MBCWEIS/mbcweisHome.html

You can tell that people in the field helped to pull this home page together. I think it is a wonderful resource for teachers. It has basic information on what resources are available to local adult literacy programs and descriptions of each local adult education program in the Boston adult literacy technology collaborative. It has information on how to get learners involved in chats with learners in other programs, and even has curriculum that is ready to go.

One example is the numeracy exercises, which take math beyond the traditional pencil and paper grind. In addition, it has quick reference information on topics which teachers and students use on a daily basis. For example, I went into Boston weather and got a 5-day forecast. I was psyched to see that I could then check the 5-day forecast for anywhere in the world. So, I checked a couple of places.

Clearly this has immediate potential for curriculum development. ESOL students could do a weekly weather report for the class, or research the weather forecast in their own countries and then compare and contrast it with Boston’s. I could go on and on about this site. Well worth the trip!

Deirdre Kennedy
Anthony D. Perkins Community Center
Boston, MA
June 12, 1996


MetroBoston Community-Wide Education and Information Service (Review 3 of 3)

http://www2.wgbh.org/MBCWEIS/mbcweisHome.html

This home page seems to be an elaborate and extensive list of community-based information networks and resources. In the Resources category, I checked into immigration information . This is an “award winning site” and indeed there was a plethora of interesting, useful and important information. For example, one category display gave up-to-date information on how to “vote smart” regarding immigration issues. Others covered legal status, work permits and visas; information pertinent to emigres from Bosnia-Herzegovina, and actual immigration forms.

In the Links to Services category I checked into Boston weather (convenient) and Job search help/Globe . The Job Search Help was really impressive. I will never use the newspaper again! ; – ) Not only was it easier to read than small newspaper print ads, but the job categories are much more narrowly defined. You can search for a job under categories from ‘architecture’ to ‘waste management.’ It is updated every Monday.

There seems to be tons of useful information at this site. I feel I have only skimmed the surface.

Julie McConville
International Institute of Boston
Boston, MA
June 7, 1996


Massachusetts One-Stop Career Center Network
http://www.detma.org/workers/centers/careercenters.htm

The Massachusetts One-Stop Career Center Network proposes a state-of-the-art doorway to employment and job training services. Since most of the Career Centers have been set up just recently, not all of their services are up and running yet. On the network’s homepage, there are four broad categories: one tells you who they are, and the other three are services they provide for individuals, employers and training providers. The Services for Individuals and Services for Employers links are currently working, but the link for Services for Training Providers (as of 6/10/96) was still under construction. There is also a Feedback link as the Career Centers are supposed to be customer-satisfaction driven.

Under Services for Individuals, links can be made to job banks (One-Stop Career Center Bank, Internet Job Banks and Business Job Banks), Education and Training, and Labor Marker Information.

Under Services for Employers two of the four links (Labor Marker Information and Find a Career Center) are also provided under other categories. The other two links are Link Your Site to Us and Talent Bank, which (as of 6/10/96) was still under construction.

Under Who We Are, background information about the development of the One-Stops as well as current One-Stop news (though there is no news yet) are provided. Under Where We Are, a career center can be found by selecting a region on the map.

The information available on this site could be very useful to students, teachers, career counselors and job developers in Massachusetts. And it is very user-friendly. For example: to search for a job in the job banks, you can simply search by a key word of a job title or position and (if you wish) specify the preferred part of the state. Then a report of the number of jobs found is presented in a chart which lists the jobs’ posting number, title, location and salary. To narrow the search further, you can specify your educational level, hours per week that you wish to work, job type (permanent, temporary, etc.), hourly or yearly salary desired.

Annie Chin
Asian American Civic Association
Boston, MA
June 10, 1996


O*NET

http://www.doleta.gov/programs/onet/

The O*NET site represents the Occupational Information Network, a database system being developed by the U.S. Department of Labor to replace the Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT). Although the Dictionary will not be online until sometime in ’98, this site can be used now because it generates a large number of connections (links) involving workforce development activities and resources.

This site can be used by teachers, counselors, and students because the links provide many useful site connections. There is a wealth of information, but be prepared to spend a good amount of time. It may take awhile to get to the exact information you want, because it is easy to get sidetracked. Set aside a good amount of time for searching; however, when I went there the links connected very quickly.

For example, from the O*NET homepage, I scrolled down about three screens and selected (from the left side menu) Frequently Asked Questions. From this page (again — about three screens down), I selected Visit the Web sites of other key workforce development initiatives… This connected me to the page, Links to Related DOL/ETA Workforce Initiatives, where I found such sites as America’s Job Bank, America’s Talent Bank, School to Work, and Career Exploration Center (to name a few). Scrolling to the bottom of the screen, I selected Career Exploration Center , which brought me to the new page, ETA Individuals – Career Exploration, which provided such topic selections as: Starting a New Career, Choosing a Career, and Jobs By Company.  I selected, Starting a New Career. This took me to Using Resources on the Internet to Plan your Future, where I found Internet Job Search, which listed the topics I had in mind when I started my search. The topics included:

1. Why bother to use the Internet?

2. How the Internet can help.

3. Comprehensive directories.

4. Private Job lists.

5. Newspaper ads.

6. Newsgroup job listings.

7. Search Firms.

8. Resumes.

9. Career advice.

10. Research tools.

Susan Barnard
S.C.A.L.E.
Somerville, MA
October 4, 1997


Immigration Information (for Recent Immigrants and Others)

http://www2.wgbh.org/mbcweis/immigrants.html

This page has links with valuable information for recent immigrants and refugees as well as for others who are interested in immigration issues. Many practical and interesting classroom activities can be generated from these resources.

In this recent anti-immigrant climate, immigrants are often scapegoated for the general failings in society. Myths such as that immigrants are taking all the American jobs and draining the economy can be countered by The Demographic and Economic Facts. You and your students can also participate in the Immigration Opinion Poll by doing an on-line survey about recent immigration issues in America.

The Immigration Superhighway is especially useful for students with various legal status. This site can be read in English, Spanish and Russian. It provides information on getting a work permit, extending visits, requesting a change of status to become a permanent resident, eligibility for visa issuance in the U.S. and much more.

Annie Chin
Asian American Civic Association
Boston, MA
June 10, 1996


Immigration Inquiry Map

http://www2.wgbh.org/mbcweis/immigrantmap.html

This site presents a student-generated project done by the UMass Medical Center ESOL class It includes a survey for recent immigrants, as well as answers to some of the questions acquired through student research. Because it is student-centered, it is a wonderful place to go to elicit students’ thoughts and opinions on immigration. Some sample questions include:

1. What is the Simpson Bill?

2. What are the main reasons people immigrate here?

3. How many people immigrate to the U.S. each year and what countries do they come from?

4. What is the biggest problem for second generation immigrants?

5. What do American citizens think about immigrants?

Students using this site are not only encouraged to explore the survey questions and research presented here, but to add any new questions, responses, or insights they may have. I am looking forward to using this site as an initial way in to talking about immigration with my beginning level ABE students and to eventually having them follow up with their own research.

Wendy Hagan
Asian American Civic Association
Boston , MA
October 4, 1997


Collected Visions

http://cvisions.nyu.edu

Collected Visions is a collaborative project which uses family snapshots collected from over 300 people to explore how family photographs have shaped our memories.

Users can search an on-line database of over 500 photographs by choosing from the following categories:

What is the time period of the photograph?

Who are the subjects in the photo?

If the subject is children, what are the ages of the children in the photo?

What is the photo of?

Where was the photo taken?

Either one or a number of photos appear on the screen and the user can choose and create a photo montage. Space is provided to write an essay about the photo(s). The user’s written essay can then be checked/compared with the information originally submitted with the photo. The final product is a “photo essay” where the user has chosen the photos, written a text and chosen the format – image size, background color, text color, etc.

Additionally, users are invited to submit family snapshots to the project for “publication” in the database. It is this aspect of Collected Visions that appeals to me as a way of introducing the students I currently teach to computers and the Internet. Few, if any, are computer literate, and we do not have access to computers in our program at the moment. By having them first write in class about photos; then, if they choose to, submit their writings to the online project; and then introducing them to the project on the computer (probably at the public library), we can accomplish a number of objectives.

Joan Frutkoff
Jewish Vocational Services
Boston, MA
June 5, 1996


Education Teachers’ Place

http://forum.swarthmore.edu/teachers/adult.ed

The Adult Education Teachers’ Place provides teachers of GED-Math programs with information concerning the basics of a regular GED test, its challenges, how to overcome them and ways to provide the students with skills that will be useful to them beyond the GED test.

The first way the web site provides this information is through articles written by teachers with experience specific to GED-Math education. Within each of these articles, the author looks at one of the topics and provides the reader with personal experiences. They then suggest how to improve the teaching quality, and address questions that often come up concerning the use of different techniques, such as calculators and word problems. Further on in the series of articles, they discuss numeracy, its meaning and uses. In other words, they help a teacher to plan class activities which relate math to everyday uses math more interesting by relating math to the students’ own lives beyond the GED.

Each article contains a suggested reading list, through which teachers can find further articles on the topic. Then the website also provides further group distribution links for groups and councils that delve deeper into the aspects of teaching GED skills.

This website is a sub-site of the Teachers’ Place, which is also a good resource for activities within the classroom dealing with Math and its uses. They update the site with a daily math problem which provides students of all ages with a fun challenge. Further, there are fun math learning skills and curriculum, and suggestions for any software that might assist teachers in planning a lesson.

I found this site to be very helpful in answering questions I’ve had surrounding challenging areas. It has connections to useful sites and resources, as well as provided ways to make math fun for any age, K-Adult.

Christine M. Luth
Project Hope
Boston, MA
October 4, 1997


The Numeracy Homepage — Pizza Math

http://www2.wgbh.org/mbcweis/ltc/clc/numintro.html##activities

Pizza Math is a fun, interactive math activity which lends itself nicely to follow-up discussion. Students design their own “virtual pizzas” by selecting among humorous choices of toppings, sizes, and categories. Because prices and pictures of the toppings choices are not included on the menu, students are often surprised by what they see when their pizzas are printed out. Students can talk to students from other learning centers about the experience of selecting the “Let’s Talk About Math” option.

Ashley Hager
Community Learning Center
Cambridge, MA
June 1, 1996


Lifelong Learning Online (LLLO): Key to Community — Voter Involvement Project

http://www.otan.dni.us/cdlp/vip/home.html

This is a self-study, interactive tutorial which focuses on issues about voting. It was created by adult learners to help other adult learners learn about voting.

The user can choose to go step-by-step through the entire tutorial or to work on individual sections, of which there are three:

  • How to vote
  • Easy Reader Voter Guide
  • How to be heard and to make a difference

Each section has a number of sub-sections, e.g. “How to vote” is divided into:

  • Getting ready to vote
  • Voting
  • Words to know
  • Credits

The material is presented in a number of formats — giving information, answering yes/no, true/false and multiple choice questions.

The tutorial has a good teacher’s page which provides the following information:

  • What the tutorial is about, listing the three sections
  • What is needed in terms of software for a user to access the tutorial
  • What students need to know to do the tutorial.

The tutorial itself is well organized and fun to do, and could be especially useful for review for someone taking a citizenship class/test.

I have three reservations about this site:

  1. It was difficult to access using the entire address. (As a novice, at first I didn’t realize that I need not enter the whole address.)
  2. It seemed to take a long time to get to the main menu and the body of the tutorial itself. There was a lot of unnecessary verbiage (often only two lines on a page).
  3. The tutorial is very detailed and I got a little confused about which section I was in.

Joan Frutkoff
Jewish Vocational Services
Boston, MA
June 5, 1996


Housing and How to Deal With Landlords

http://www2.wgbh.org/mbcweis/ltc/aaca/housing.html

Housing and How to Deal with Landlords is a must-visit site for teachers of beginning levels ESOL learners, especially those learners still very much new in the U.S.  It is very useful in exposing students to what they need to know as tenants, from contacting the landlords about simple problems to dealing with difficult landlords. More importantly, it provides a list of objects around the house, that the students can simply click on, if the words are unfamiliar to view drawings of the objects to which the words refer.

This is particularly fascinating since the resources are student-generated. This site can also link you to other useful resources on the web.

Victor Eboigbe
Haitian Multi-service Center
Dorchester, MA
October 4, 1997


National Women’s History Project

http://www.nwhp.org

The National Women’s History Project linked from Femina. This site contains great quotes for my class. (Example: Every time a girl reads a womanless history she learns she is worth less. Sadler) It includes ideas for Women’s History Month, and for teachers, parents and community members.


Internet Public Library

http://ipl.sils.umich.edu/

I went to Reference, and Science and Technology in order to do research for a Botany unit I’m preparing to teach. The best site was the Tree Care Consumer Information from the International Society of Arboriculture. I had high hopes for the New York Botanical Garden home page but they did not include trees. Time-Life Encyclopedia of Plants had promise.

Cara Streck
Project Hope
Boston, Mass.
June 4, 1996


CNN

http://www.CNN.com

I like this site. I think it is great that you can get news on-line and eliminate buying a newspaper or waiting up to watch the evening news. I went to USA Today and to CNN. Harried teachers who don’t have the time to check the news can do so on the net, and students can use it for reading, research and any other classroom activities which are developed using newspapers. It literally puts newspapers and CNN, with the wealth of information they have to offer, at one’s finger tips. In addition, they have easy filters which make finding specific topics of interest a lot faster than checking in an index and then leafing through a newspaper.

Deirdre Kennedy
Anthony D. Perkins Community Center
Boston, MA
June 12, 1996


California Distance Learning Project (CDLP) — San Francisco CNN Stories for New Readers

http://www.otan.dni.us/cdlp/cdlp.html

This is an informative and fun site. It features a daily CNN news story, followed by a number of activity choices.

There is an immediate, well-designed menu which asks the user to choose the full text, edited text, or an outline. After reading the text, one can select a variety of comprehension and language activities:

  • vocabulary (definitions)
  • select a word (finish the sentence)
  • multiple choice questions
  • sequencing (events of the story)
  • conclusions (inference questions)
  • show and tell *writing a short essay)

(This would be terrific in a multi-level class, allowing different students to work on the same materials, at their own pace, on activities of varying difficulty.)

The story has a few very good graphics (not requiring a long time to download) which really enhance the text. I read Buddhist Temple built in Northern California and got a very good image of the temple.

In addition to the story, there is an informative teacher’s page which includes: a rationale for reading articles on screen; the purpose of the story; a description of the story-of-the-week article; curriculum activities; and an invitation to users to post responses online. There are additional sections: Education Archive; CNN’s Homepage; a section called “Questions?”; an email address and credits.

Joan Frutkoff
Jewish Vocational Services
Boston, MA
June 5, 1996


ESOL (ESL)

Dave’s ESL Cafe (Review 1 of 2)

http://www.eslcafe.com/

Dave’s ESL Cafe has some very interesting information for teachers, particularly those who may be searching for ESL positions in other parts of the United States or worldwide.

In addition, this site has a section of ideas other teachers have tried successfully in their classrooms. In the Help Center teachers can receive help from other ESL/EFL teachers worldwide. Areas of assistance include grammar, TOEFL, writing, vocabulary, slang, etc.

There is a One-step ESL Search Page at the ESL Cafe Search whereby one can search the entire Web with search engines such as Yahoo, InfoSeek, Lycos, Web Crawler, AltaVista, Galaxy and others.

The Quiz embodies such areas as current news, geography, grammar, history, idioms, slang words, people, reading comprehension, science, writing, world cultures, American language and culture, and numbers. Each area contains multiple choice questions for students to answer.

Teachers are invited to contribute quizzes to add to those already found at this site.

This site helps students learn what, in a traditional setting, may be dull or boring while, at the same time, it gives them a lot of practice manipulating the mouse and helps them become more comfortable with the computer in general.

Joyce A. Barney
WAITT House
Boston, MA
May, 1996


Dave’s ESL Cafe (Review 2 of 2)

http://www.eslcafe.com/

This site is totally impressive. It is extremely well organized, accessible and up-to-date. The graphics were simple, quickly loaded, and fun. I checked into it at 7:30 AM on Saturday, June 6th and it had already been updated to June 6th (and ‘Dave’ lives on the West Coast!). It is obviously a site that teachers and students visit daily.

I spent a great deal of time at this site because there was so much to see. There were basically seven different categories of information to check into. I checked into them all. Here is a brief description of what I found.

  • #1. ESL QUIZ PAGE – This page featured numerous quizzes students could take to test their     knowledge of: current news, geography, grammar, idioms (“whatchamacallit” and “vege out”), science, world culture, and punctuation. I took a few quizzes and they were fun. Apparently there is a scoring mechanism to tabulate how well you did on the quizzes but it wouldn’t work on my computer.

#2. ESL HELP CENTER – This page offered an opportunity for students to ask teachers ESL-related questions. This was a very interesting page to read and it seemed carefully maintained and quickly updated. Students asked some very good questions and various teachers took conscientious stabs at answering the questions or pointing students in directions to find more information.

#3. SEARCH ENGINE PAGE – This page seems to be a place where the search for ESL material, resources, and information is made easy. Yahoo, InfoSeek, Lycos, are presented and those of us who are daunted by the search engine concept are put at ease and given direction.

#4. ESL IDEA PAGE – I wish I had had access to this page when I was learning to teach; I had such a trial-by-fire, isolated, learn-by-doing experience. Yet, at Dave’s ESL Cafe I saw that a new teacher who accessed page was able to ask an experienced teacher about teaching methods and approaches. She received a very thoughtful and understanding answer, that was available for all to see, the next day. Cruising this page I spotted extensively detailed ideas on how to teach using charades, circulars, jokes, pen pals and journals.

#5 GRAFFITI WALL – This place was certainly something to see. Largely it seemed to be ESL learners putting their ESL voice on the computer for the first time and asking for a response. Many people were asking for pen pals and were offering their e-mail addresses. I wonder how effective this ‘wall’ is in setting up consistent pen-pal relationships.

#6. LINKS – This page was very interesting and informative. Mainly it’s intention is to link teachers or students to resources which will answer their questions. One LINK informed teachers of articles that were published on ‘The Net’ that focused on ESL teaching issues. Another LINK pointed teachers toward Job Links Teaching Internationally or the ESL JOB CENTER for local teaching opportunities.

#7. CONNECTION – This category provided e-mail access, message exchanges, and a chance for students to communicate in ‘real time.’ It was the area where I spent the least amount of time but which seemed to have the most possibilities in terms of communication.

As I mentioned before Dave’s ESL Cafe is a very impressive site. It seems to be given a great deal of attention both by those who monitor it and by those who visit it. To me, it truly represents the wonderful potential of using the Internet for ESL teachers and students. It receives my highest recommendation for a visit.

Julie McConville
International Institute of Boston
Boston, MA
June 7, 1996


EL CENTRO DEL CARDENAL

http://www2.wgbh.org/MBCWEIS/LTC/ElCentro/HomeRemedies.html

This exercise formulated by the staff at EL CENTRO DEL CARDENAL in Boston is a very useful activity for learners to participate in. The publicizing of Home Remedies allows the learners the opportunity to share part of their culture and also it affords them the opportunity to feel good about themselves and their way of life. Often, the medical and health care systems that others have been raised under are dwarfed and/or minimized by the standards of health care found in the United States. It is also interesting to note that Home Remedies are not limited to ESOL speakers but are widely used and accepted among the general English-speaking population. It is a powerful way to have students share age old secrets and to get to know, better understand, and appreciate each other. The sharing of the information may also serve to reduce barriers that have been erected between and among people.

The use of this type of content allows learners to draw from their knowledge base and to utilize information that they are quite familiar with. The use of familiar content is generally a good way of introducing or transitioning to new material, vocabulary and the development of new skills. In addition, the format utilized allows learners to improve their comprehension and overall reading skills. Everybody can be an expert while increasing their own personal store of knowledge. As the article mentions, Home Remedies have been highly effective for generations in curing a variety of ailments, however, it, also, points out the limitations that such remedies have had in the overall healing process.

From an administrative point of view I wonder as to the possible connection between absenteeism and the use of Home Remedies. It would be interesting to study the number of absences experienced by learners and the utilization of Home Remedies in place of traditional medical practices. From the article there appears much to be learned from this approach by all.

Joel Hurwitz
Dimock Community Health Center
Roxbury, MA
October 17, 1998


Email Projects Home Page
Formerly, The California Email Project

http://www.otan.dni.us/webfarm/emailproject/email.htm

Of all the sites I explored this was the most interesting. It was easy to access and the directions were quite simple. Perfect for a novice user!

On this site there were many interesting topics: Learners’ Stories, where one can read stories written by students in adult education programs. Especially interesting were the Burmese Water Festival and Supermarket Day. Immigration Stories was equally interesting to read and would provide great topics for classroom discussion.

There is also the Pizza Home Page wherein students can create their own “project” and enter it on the site.

The Annotated Book Lists page looked very promising. The goal of this section is to have parents list books that they have enjoyed reading to or with their children so that others could benefit from their experience. In family literacy programs which encourage the reading connection, this would be a wonderful asset.

There also appeared to be a section on Health Education which you could research using Yahoo. This site deserves in-depth investigation.

Gloria R Adomkaitis
Boston Public Schools
Boston, MA
June, 1996


Frizzy University Network (FUN) (Review 1 of 3)

http://thecity.sfsu.edu/~funweb/Welcome.html

There are so many sites within this one site that it is hard to explain. It has been set up to help ESOL students improve their writing skills, but there is so much more to learn here. Students who travel through this “campus” will find ways to improve their reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. There are many “exits” at this site that will link you and your students to other sites. If you have time and truly want to “browse”, this is a good place to do it. You can explore and learn at Frizzy University.

I “entered” the Fun 202 Course and looked at the assignments. It was a good exercise in writing for advanced students. Surely this site is a good resource for teachers.

Ellen Dabrieo, SND
Notre Dame Education Center
South Boston, Massachusetts
June, 1996


Frizzy University Network (FUN) (Review 2 of 3)

http://thecity.sfsu.edu/~funweb/Welcome.html

I was really curious to find out about Frizzy’s hair, but I never got to see a picture or anything that would give me any indication. I do, however, know that her real name is Karla L. Frizler. I think that “Frizzy” is her nickname. On this site ESOL teachers can find new resources and tools to be used in class. Students can use it to read materials written by other ESOL students. This page has recipes, postcards, etc.

I liked the art section. I found electronic postcards from Paul Gauguin’s paintings. They showed women of Tahiti doing differently daily life activities, very beautiful and rich in color.

I also visited the Wings Electronic Magazine. Although I found it very interesting, this site would be for ESOL advanced students who are also intermediate Internet users. You can also get handouts, like the “Unofficial Intensive English Program Mini Course,” which outlines the different stages of the program and how to apply it. There are also many links to other educational web sites.

Heide Vermeulen
Mujeres Unidas En Accion
Boston, MA
June 28, 1996


Frizzy University Network (FUN) (Review 3 of 3)

http://thecity.sfsu.edu/~funweb/Welcome.html

This site attempts to help ESOL students improve their writing. Students share their ideas, opinions and feelings in written English. It provides tips for anyone interested in creating his or her own homepage. It contains grammar workshops designed for ESOL students. It also has student-generated web pages including “WINGS,” a monthly electronic magazine that features student writing, art and movie reviews. The student magazine is uncensored and does contain a large amount of profanity.

Margaret McPartland
Jackson/Mann Community Center and
RCC Prep
Boston, MA
June 6, 1996


Grammar Safari

http://deil.lang.uiuc.edu/web.pages/grammarsafari.html

The idea of electronically searching for elusive yet fascinating English grammar structures is appealing. There are suggestions for “hunting” and “collecting” examples of specific words as they are used in documents accessible to anyone on the Web. But the activity requires solid knowledge of grammar, and seems too complicated for basic Adult ESL students. It may be helpful to students preparing for TOEFL.

Eileen Dacher
Immigrant Learning Center
Malden, MA
October 17, 1998


LEO (Learning English Online) Lab

http://www.aec.ukans.edu/LEO/index.html

Under the heading “Culture” click on “Holidays” and you’ll be able to choose from Halloween, Thanksgiving, Ground Hog Day, Christmas, Martin Luther King’s Birthday, Valentine’s Day, Easter, Memorial Day and other holidays. After choosing “Thanksgiving” I had another 20 or so choices including programs, parades, football, several historically-related topics, recipes, arts, turkey tips, wishbone etiquette, poetry, and a puzzle which produced an intermediate level word search.

Michele A. Weaver
Vietnamese-American Civic Assn.
Boston, MA
June, 1996


OPPortunities in ESL…Theme-Based Pages

http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~leslieob/themes.html

OPPortunities in ESL…Theme-Based Pages is a collection of resources on contemporary and historical issues to be used in ESOL classes. By using the table of contents, teachers can select issues or topics of interest to them and their students (e.g. abortion, gun control, affirmative action, or the Holocaust) and find readings and other materials to use in classes. The information on these pages is linked to a wide variety of other Web sites. Of particular interest is the way the authors have gathered resources from contrasting perspectives on issues such as gun control and abortion; this will be useful in developing students’ critical reading and thinking skills.

One problem with the site is that it is not always clear who has authored the material (and whether you are still on this site or have moved to another one) and to what extent the authors have actually used these materials with students and are recommending them. The site would be very useful, though, as a starting point for teachers who are developing theme-based curricula with their students.

Alice Levine
Boston, MA
October 4, 1997


The Web as Input for Writing: TESOL `96

http://deil.lang.uiuc.edu/resources/TESOL/Heidi/Pbackground.html

The Web is introduced after students have received training for: typing, reading and composing e-mail, and writing with a word processor. The activities provide a good introduction to using the Web as a tool to encounter, search, summarize and react to information. This activity is geared to two hour-long classes in networked computer labs for students with a strong interest in using the Web. The most helpful link on this site is Finding reading materials on the Web: a few suggestions.

Eileen Dacher
Immigrant Learning Center
Malden, MA
October 17,1998


Adult Secondary Education (GED/EDP)

collegenet

http://www.Collegenet.com/

For my GED students, many of whom hope to go to college, looking at the sample data at this site would be informative. Interested students could practice filling out the application to get an idea of the kinds of information they might be asked to provide.

I found the application process frustrating because there seems to be no way (at least apparent to me) to move through the form quickly. One is forced to go through every blank line in order to reach the next section.

Cara Streck
Project Hope
Boston, Mass.
June 4, 1996


The Math Forum@ Drexel /High School Teachers Place

http://forum.swarthmore.edu/teachers/high

This site offers resources for the classroom (activities, individual lesson plans, collected sets of lesson plans, fun sites, and math software) and for the professional development of high school math teachers (workshops, conferences, mailings lists, articles and publications, professional organizations).

I was very pleased with what I saw. Although I’m a novice to the Internet, I had no trouble moving around within this site, and I was totally amazed at the depth of lesson plans, activities and ideas presented, over 1200 in all.

This site is worth a bookmark to every ABE math teacher.

Pat Fina,
Community Learning Center,
Cambridge, MA
October 17, 1998


Project-based Learning

Inquiry Maps (Review 1 of 2)

http://www2.wgbh.org/mbcweis/ltc/alri/I.M.html

I found this site quite interesting. It begins with some conversation about Project-based Learning, Inquiry Maps and the Internet. This conversation is followed by two articles by David Rosen, which are based on excerpts from the conversation. Rosen explains very clearly what project-based learning and inquiry maps are and how to use them in the classroom. He uses good examples from student experiences and shows how to expand upon them. There are links to more information about this topic.

Ellen Dabrieo, SND
Notre Dame Education Center
South Boston, Massachusetts
June, 1996


Inquiry Maps (Review 2 of 2)

http://www2.wgbh.org/mbcweis/ltc/alri/I.M.html

This site explains what an inquiry map is and how it functions. It is based completely on participatory learning.

First, the group chooses a topic. The participants generate questions which are both real and important. Then, they identify and choose the methods of inquiry they will use in the project.

Some of the methods of inquiry are interviewing in person and by telephone; documenting personal experience; conducting surveys; observing and recording information in a systematic manner; experimentation; library research, including the use of reference books; doing research with databases on the Web; and posting questions to Net user groups or electronic lists..

After completing the preceding steps, the participants plan and carry out their research. They present their findings, usually in prose, but sometimes in a chart, graph, photos, or other media.

Other participants read and critique their findings. The process can be repeated based on new or existing questions.

This site can be quite helpful to educators who want to implement participatory learning in their classes. The explanations are very clear and explicit.

It seems to be the type of project which needs very little teacher motivation, since it requires so much student involvement. The students should love it.

Joyce A. Barney
WAITT House
Boston, MA
May 1996


Nutrition Inquiry Map

http://www2.wgbh.org/mbcweis/ltc/sccc/Nutrlmap/example.html

The information for this Inquiry Map on nutrition was provided by the Health Action Team at SCALE in Somerville, Massachusetts. Nutrition was one of the health issues the team of four ESOL students and one teacher decided to investigate.

The I-Map starts with a series of questions which you can click on to explore further. The response to the question “What are some foods to limit in a diet?”, for example, lists several substances including fat, salt, sugar and alcohol, and explains why they can be dangerous in excess.

Other questions such as “What vitamins does the body need?” and “What are the necessary nutrients?” have equally well-organized answers.

Janet Nicholas
Boston Community Centers
Boston, MA
June, 1996


Immigration Inquiry Map

http://www2.wgbh.org/mbcweis/immigrantmap.html

This site presents a student-generated project done by the UMass Medical Center ESOL class It includes a survey for recent immigrants, as well as answers to some of the questions acquired through student research. Because it is student-centered, it is a wonderful place to go to elicit students’ thoughts and opinions on immigration. Some sample questions include:

1. What is the Simpson Bill?

2. What are the main reasons people immigrate here?

3. How many people immigrate to the U.S. each year and what countries do they come from?

4. What is the biggest problem for second generation immigrants?

5. What do American citizens think about immigrants?

Students using this site are not only encouraged to explore the survey questions and research presented here, but to add any new questions, responses, or insights they may have. I am looking forward to using this site as an initial way in to talking about immigration with my beginning level ABE students and to eventually having them follow up with their own research.

Wendy Hagan
Asian American Civic Association
Boston , MA
October 4, 1997


Headaches Inquiry Map

http://www2.wgbh.org/mbcweis/ltc/aaca/headache.html

This was something adult ESOL students did for academic research to help improve their English. They wrote about headaches by researching first in the encyclopedia and then designing questions about the nature of headaches and reasons for headaches to their friends, family and classmates. They also came up with solutions to help sufferers according to each studentÕs cultural framework. This is a unique method of teaching students how to make wh-questions, critical thinking and to get students to talk. Everybody suffers from a headache at one time or another and so students can identify with this problem and find such classwork actually useful. I will certainly use this topic in the future. Sometimes the simplest ideas can work wonders for students to make learning and language learning very interesting.

Furthermore, Web site addresses were included which can be followed up with explanations of different types of headaches and how to ease them in different languages.

Since I am a migraine headache sufferer myself , I chose to explore this type of map inquiry. Not only that, I was able to read in German. German is my first language. I felt good after my initial surprise to find something like this under Adult Literacy!!!

Ramona Boylan
Asian American Civic Association
Boston, MA
October 17, 1998


Adult Education Research

How Easy Is It for Adult Educators to Use the Information Superhighway?

http://www2.wgbh.org/MBCWEIS/LTC/ALRI/Cruising.html

This is a study of how adult literacy practitioners are using the Internet. It offers support for those educators who might be fearful of using the Internet, or even of using computers in general.

This site gives an idea of how many teachers are using the Internet and what percentages use it in various ways.

In this site, educators can find ideas on overcoming obstacles such as finding a mentor, joining special interest groups, learning with others or participating in online chats.

Respondents have indicated that they are using the Internet for a variety of adult education activities such as e-mail exchanges with colleagues; using electronic lists or message forums; participating in newsgroups to get and share information; searching databases for information; uploading and downloading files; research; working on projects with colleagues; reading online magazines or journals; reviewing teacher-made curricula or lesson plans; helping students do electronic pen-pal-ing; job searching; searching online news databases (e.g. UP, AP, Reuters, etc.) for adult education-related information.

Any adult educator who has doubts about the usefulness of the Internet in the learning process or for professional development would do well to search this site.

Joyce A. Barney
WAITT House
Boston, MA
May, 1996


Grants Information

Center for Urban Development and Empowerment (CURE) Florida Atlantic University

http://www.fau.edu/divdept/cupa/cure/cure.htm

CURE’s Web site aims to help those who are serving the needs of low-income minority people specifically. It provides invaluable resources to grant writers and useful information about Higher Education, Immigration, U.S. Economy, Urban Affairs, Non-Profit Organizations and Census Population, and other data sets.

Other Web-based Resources found, but not reviewed:

The Foundation Center

http://fdncenter.org/

Corporate Funding – Academic Innovations

http://www.academicinnovations.com/corpfun.html#ad

Annie Chin
Asian American Civic Association
Boston, MA
June 10, 1996


Other Interesting Sites

The Whitehouse

http://www.whitehouse.gov

This site was fascinating. It allows you to check on the President’s daily press releases and see what is of current interest and what the President’s position is on that topic. It also gives you background information about the President, Vice President, their families, the Whitehouse and past presidents. There is a photo library so that a picture can be put with a President or a specific event. I think that the photo library is a great resource. In addition, this site gives you easy access into more detailed information about the different branches of government, as well as specific government departments. There is also an educational feature geared specifically to children. Having parents and children visit this section together would make a great family literacy activity.

Deirdre Kennedy
Anthony D. Perkins Community Center
Boston, Mass.
June 12, 1996


The Children’s Literature Web Guide

http://www.acs.ucalgary.ca/~dkbrown/

I was very pleased when I came across The Children’s Literature Web Guide. This is a great place to look for all aids in child development. The page is set up in four easy-to-explore subheadings:

Features: This is a good place to start. This area has information about new or updated books that are now available to children and their teachers. It is a useful place to look for fresh materials which could be helpful to elementary teachers. There is also a commentary section that gives reviews of previously read books by both adults and adolescents. Here they are able to express their opinions about books they did or did Not like. This kind of communication between readers is helpful in choosing books to read in and out of the classroom. I can imagine that the responses could be very beneficial to librarians. They need to know what kids and parents are interested in. Finally, a listing of essential Web sites of both instructional and enjoyable reading material.

Discussion Boards: This section is the place to find anything there is to know about upcoming book conferences and events. Everyone who wants to find the information but who just does Not know where to look, this is the place. It gives a recent list of what’s going on and where to find it. Readers Helping Readers is just what it says it is. Readers are able to give their own review about a particular book or to ask questions which are then posted. Other Web surfers can look on the site and respond to the questions or comments.

Quick Reference: This section should be used to review materials and it may be help with the purchase of your next book. It lists children’s book awards and best sellers along with suggestions of books for reading teachers of children. Lists such as these help to filter out the books that may not be so good and give insight to the current favorites.

More Links: This is my favorite part of the website. I had a lot of fun looking around at all of the different things that it has to offer. There is one particular site called Resources For Teachers that gives several ideas to help teachers in the classroom and even materials that you can print out to use right away.

I think this is a well organized website that could be useful to both teachers and children. I also like it because it is straightforward and not complicated.

Emily N. La Porte
International Learning Center YMCA
Boston, MA
October 17, 1998


Multicultural Home Page

http://pasture.ecn.purdue.edu/~agenhtml/agenmc/index.html

This page features the arts and cultures of countries around the globe. Countries are listed alphabetically under five continents: Africa (Senegal), America (Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Haiti, Puerto Rico), Asia &Pacific Islands (China, India, Korea, Philippines), Europe (France), and the Mid-East (Israel.) This homepage is very much a work in progress. Although there are only eleven country sites up (as of 6/10/96) — and two of these are under construction –those that are already up offer a wealth of information and a feast for the eyes and ears (if you have the right audio software.)

For example, within the Art of China Homepage, you can sample the richness of China’s art from different periods and experience the movement and spirit of Chinese characters written in different calligraphy styles. You can also enjoy listening to selected Chinese classical music and songs or seeing spectacular scenery from different regions of the country. You can try out the tutorial of survival Chinese in Mandarin or recipes for popular Chinese dishes. For those interested in the Chinese Zodiac and the science of Feng Shiu, links to the Asian Astrology Homepage are also provided.

This site can provide lots of fun as well as intercultural sharing and learning for everyone.

Annie Chin
Asian American Civic Association
Boston, MA
June 10, 1996


Multiple Intelligences for Adult Literacy and Adult Education

http://literacyworks.org/mi/flash.html

This is a useful site for teachers who want to learn more about incorporating the theory of multiple intelligences into the teaching of basic skills and adult literacy. It gives ideas for assessment and some teaching tips that will help teachers begin thinking of learning strategies in terms of the seven intelligences.

Unfortunately, it doesnÕt give enough theory so that you can understand the intelligences without some previous knowledge of them, and many of the interesting categories are not yet active links. Hopefully these will soon be activated, and more theoretical information will be added, which would make this site much more useful and interesting.

Meryl Becker
SCALE, Somerville, MA
Chelsea ABE, Chelsea, MA
October 17, 1998

 

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